Julie A. Cunningham

Academic Advisor

Finding Your Passion

1 Comment

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I’ve been at a bit of a fork in the road lately in regards to career development.  I absolutely love educational technology.  And reading.  And researching.  And learning.  And anything tech related.

In my current job, I’m much more about information literacy than teaching how to use applications. (Unless those applications are used to teach children to draft, write, edit on a word processor rather than just type up a final copy.)   I want to open the world to students- look at the Eiffel Tower with Google Earth, learn how to dig for information with good search techniques, watch an eaglet grow up through the lens of a webcam, collaboratively track butterfly migration patterns, interview a marine biologist via Skype, watch incredible video clips, and listen to incredible people read books to us.  The globalization of education excites me, and I want students to have access to all those things.

Yesterday, I sat in my house and took a trip down memory lane to Banchory, UK.  Using Google Maps, I was able to ‘walk’ through the small Scottish town where I visited my grandparents in the late 80’s. It’s an amazing thing, to be able to connect in that way with the past.  Looking at this past gives us appreciation for the present, and a vision for the future.

What does all this have to do with finding your passion?  Everything, actually.  I think I’m some kind of digital 21st century librarian at heart.  I’m not sure there’s a job description out there right now in education for someone to help others, both young and old, navigate the digital world.  Thankfully, there are others blazing this trail with a strong educational foundation that are willing to share what they have learned, like Colette Cassinelli.

As for that fork, we’ll see which road I take…. the one less traveled by, maybe?

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference. 1

1 Frost, Robert. Mountain Interval. New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1920; Bartleby.com, 1999. www.bartleby.com/119/. [Date of Printout].

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One thought on “Finding Your Passion

  1. A very thoughtful reflection. I liked your description about traveling down memory lane. I will have to explore that more.